Bruce Thorson-USA TODAY Sports

MLB Draft 2014: San Diego Padres 40 Round Draft Recap


San Diego, CA- As the MLB Draft has come to a close we take a look at the 40 players the San Diego Padres have added to their minor league system.

The San Diego Padres began the draft by going heavy on college players over high school prospects, selecting only three prep players in the first 20 rounds. The Padres also went heavy on drafting position players as the Padres needed to add offensive talent to a minor league system that desperately lacks impact offensive talent. The San Diego Padres selected position players with five of their first six picks. The San Diego Padres went on a run for pitching prospects in the middle of the draft selecting 13 consecutive pitchers from the 14th to the 26th round.

Heres a complete rundown of the players the San Diego Padres drafted from rounds 1-40:

Round 1: SS Trea Turner (N.C. State)

Trea Turner is the sixth shortstop the Padres have drafted in the 1st round of the MLB draft. The San Diego Padres previously drafted shortstop Bill Almon (’74), Joey Cora (’85), Matt Halloran (’96), Kevin Nicholson (’97) and Greene (’02).

Many mock drafts had Trea Turner going to the San Diego Padres at No.13. Turner hit .321 with eight home runs and stole 26 bases this season for NC State. Here is the scouting profile by Jonathan Mayo of MLB.com on Turner:

Though Turner stands out most for his top-of-the-scale speed, he’s more than just a burner.

With his wheels and ability to make contact and control the strike zone, he has the tools to become a quality leadoff hitter at the Major League level. The key will be toning down his swing, which can get long, and his approach, which can get a little out of control. He can get home run-conscious and would be best served by focusing on getting on base, where his speed and instincts make him a prime basestealing threat.

A third baseman as a freshman, Turner moved to shortstop in 2013. He has the quickness and arm strength to stick at shortstop, something few college players do, though he needs to improve his defensive consistency.  - Jonathan Mayo MLB.com

Round 2: OF Michael Gettys (Gainesville, Ga., HS)

This is a great pick for the Padres. Michael Gettys might be the most gifted athlete in this years draft class.

Getty’s possesses above-average raw power potential, legitimate plus-plus speed, elite arm strength and a decent bat with plus bat speed and power, but also needs to work to make more consistent contact.

Gettys is similar to Colorado Rockies Drew Stubbs as they’re both exceptional athletes with plus tools.

Here is the scouting profile by Jonathan Mayo of MLB.com on Gettys:

Michael Gettys, a Georgia recruit, entered the spring with a chance to follow in the footsteps of Byron BuxtonClint Frazier and Austin Meadows as a Georgia high school outfielder selected in the top 10 picks. Though his tools are among the best of any of this year’s prepsters, his performance during the spring hurt his chances to be such an early selection.

Michael Gettys made waves at the start of the showcase circuit last summer, running a 6.43-second 60-yard dash, clocking 100 mph on a throw from the outfield and working at 91-94 mph from the mound at the Perfect Game National Showcase in June. He has an explosive swing to match his athleticism, giving him above-average raw power.

But Gettys has struggled to make consistent contact. He swings and misses more than scouts like and especially struggles against breaking balls. Still, his combination of speed and power makes him an enticing prospect.

- Jonathan Mayo MLB.com

Round 3: RHP Zech Lemond (Rice)

Zech Lemond was a first-round talent coming into the season, but his recent elbow injury raises about whether he can be a starter long term or a hard throwing reliever out if the bullpen. Most scouts project Zech Lemond as a No. 3 starting pitcher/late-inning reliever with good command, an above average fastball, curveball and a developing change-up and slider.

Here is the scouting profile by Jonathan Mayo of MLB.com on Zech Lemond:

Zech Lemond set the Rice record for saves last year with 14, one more than future big leaguers David Aardsma and Tony Cingrani posted in their best seasons with the Owls. He began 2014 as Rice’s closer once again, but when projected ace Jordan Stephens blew out his elbow, Lemond moved to the rotation in March.

Because he pitched so well and didn’t see any dropoff in stuff in much longer outings, Zech Lemond put himself in position to go in the top 50 picks of the Draft. But because the Owls didn’t exactly ease him into his new role, he was sidelined with elbow inflammation after five starts.

Before he went out, Zech Lemond operated with a 92-96 mph fastball with some arm-side run on a nice downward plane. His spike curveball can climb as high as 85 mph and makes batters look silly, though it also can be tough to command. He had no problem working his fading changeup into his mix and continued to throw strikes. 

- Jonathan Mayo MLB.com

Round 4: RF Nick Torres (Cal Poly)

Nick Torres, 6-foot-1, was a three-year starter for the Cal Poly Mustangs in right field and lead them to their first Big West Conference title and the program’s first hosted NCAA regional this season.

Nick Torres batted .322 with a 17 doubles, six home runs and 52 RBI, leading the Mustangs in all categories.

Here is the scouting profile by Jonathan Mayo of MLB.com on Nick Torres:

With the typical dearth of college bats, one who performs well is bound to move up boards. Do it while hitting third for one of the better college teams in the country, and you’re bound to make even more noise.

Nick Torres has the kind of offensive profile teams like to see from a corner outfielder. Strong and durably built, Torres has the ability to make hard contact consistently from the right side of the plate. His strength plus ability to square up the ball gives him a good amount of raw power to tap into. While he doesn’t have a gun, he has enough arm for right field, or he could be a solid left fielder at the next level.

Cal Poly had an outstanding 2014 season, and Nick Torres was at the heart of it. His performance and potential with the bat should get him drafted within the first four rounds. - Jonathan Mayo MLB.com

Round 5: CF Auston Bousfield (Mississippi)

Bousfield batted .349 with six home runs and 48 RBI’s for the Ole Miss Rebels.

Round 6: C Zach Risedorf (Northwestern Regional, Conn., HS)

Risedorf batted .485 with six home runs and 19 RBI’s for the the Highlanders last season and is committed to play baseball at the University of Connecticut next season.

Round 7: RHP Ryan Butler (UNC-Charlotte)

Here is the scouting profile by Jonathan Mayo of MLB.com on Ryan Butler:

Butler’s career has taken several twists and turns since he pitched Charlotte’s Kell High to the North Carolina 4A championship in 2010. He worked just 15 1/3 innings as a freshman at Marshall, prompting his transfer to Northwest Florida State JC, where he pitched 24 innings as a sophomore before blowing out his elbow and undergoing Tommy John surgery. He took classes at Central Piedmont (N.C.) CC while sitting out 2013, then hit 97 mph during a pre-Draft workout with the Yankees, who took him in the 16th round.

Butler decided to attend Charlotte rather than sign, and he should go at least 10 rounds earlier this time around. He’s all about velocity, consistently working at 91-95 mph deep into games and topping out at 99 mph. He has some sink on his fastball, but he doesn’t miss as many bats as he should because he lacks a quality secondary pitch to keep hitters from sitting on his heater.

Butler’s No. 2 pitch is a changeup with some fading action. He has tried both a curveball and a slider, and he’d probably be better off focusing on the latter because he does a better job of throwing it for strikes. His father Michael reached Triple-A as a left-hander in the Angels system. - Jonathan Mayo MLB.com

Round 8: RHP Mitch Watrous (Utah)

Watrous was named honorable mention All-Pac-12 this season after going (3-7) with a 3.91 ERA and 76 strikeouts in 96.2 innings as a junior.

Round 9: SS Nick Vilter (UC Riverside)

Vilter batted .294 with 10 home runs and 33 RBI’s for the Highlanders this season and was named Honorable Mention All-Big-West.

Round 10: LHP Thomas Dorminy (Faulkner University)

Dorminy went 11-3 with a 3.22 ERA and 131 strikeouts in 109 innings for the Eagles this season.

Round 11: OF Yale Rosen (Washington St.)

Rosen batted .294 with five homers and 13 doubles for the Cougars.

Round 12: RHP Seth Lucio (Tennessee Tech)

Lucio went 3-3 with 10 saves and a 3.55 ERA and 40 strikeouts in 38 innings for Tennessee Tech.

Round 13: 3B Joseph Epperson (UC Santa Barbara)

Epperson batted .324 with nine doubles for UCSB.

Round 14: RHP Chris Huffman (James Madison)

Huffman went 5-7 with a 6.43 ERA in 91 innings with three complete games and 69 strikeouts this season for James Madison.

Round 15: RHP Logan Jernigan (NC State)

Butler’s career has taken several twists and turns since he pitched Charlotte’s Kell High to the North Carolina 4A championship in 2010. He worked just 15 1/3 innings as a freshman at Marshall, prompting his transfer to Northwest Florida State JC, where he pitched 24 innings as a sophomore before blowing out his elbow and undergoing Tommy John surgery. He took classes at Central Piedmont (N.C.) CC while sitting out 2013, then hit 97 mph during a pre-Draft workout with the Yankees, who took him in the 16th round.

Butler decided to attend Charlotte rather than sign, and he should go at least 10 rounds earlier this time around. He’s all about velocity, consistently working at 91-95 mph deep into games and topping out at 99 mph. He has some sink on his fastball, but he doesn’t miss as many bats as he should because he lacks a quality secondary pitch to keep hitters from sitting on his heater.

Butler’s No. 2 pitch is a changeup with some fading action. He has tried both a curveball and a slider, and he’d probably be better off focusing on the latter because he does a better job of throwing it for strikes. His father Michael reached Triple-A as a left-hander in the Angels system. - Jonathan Mayo MLB.com

Round 16: LHP Taylor Cox (Tennessee at Martin)

Cox had a rough season for the Skyhawks going winless with an 8.41 ERA, but does have the talent to throw a decent fastball with a solid slider and changeup.

Round 17: RHP T.J. Weir (Ball St.)

Weir went 8-2 with a 3.61 ERA and 117 strikeouts in 99.2 innings for Ball State.

Round 18: LHP Maxwell McNabb (USD)

McNabb went 2-1 with a 3.15 ERA in 2o innings for the University of San Diego.

Round 19: RHP Justin Lewis (Greater Atlanta Chr. HS)

Lewis went 5-4 with a 1.15 ERA in 55 innings of work.

Round 20: RHP Tyler Wilson (Tennessee Wesleyan)

Round 21: RHP Peter Solomon (Mt. St. Joseph, Md., HS)

Round 22: LHP Danny Wissmann (USC Aiken)

Round 23: RHP Jason Jester (Texas A&M)

Round 24: RHP Colby Blueburg (Nevada)

Round 25: LHP Travis Radke (Portland)

Round 26: RHP Aaron Cressley (Pittsburgh Bradford)

Round 27: C Michael Fitzgerald (Indiana St.)

Round 28: SS Johnny Manziel (Texas A&M)

Round 29: SS Mitch Morales (Florida Atlantic)

Round 30: LHP Ryan Atwood (Florida Gulf Coast)

Round 31: RF Logan Sowers (McCutcheon, Ind., HS)

Round 32: LHP Taylor Aikenhead (CS Bakersfield)

Round 33: LHP Devin Smeltzer (Bishop Eustace Prep School)

Round 34: LHP Brendan McKay (Blackhawk, Pa., HS)

Round 35: RHP Cobi Johnson (J.W. Mitchell, Fla., HS)

Johnson’s father Dane was a second-round pick in the 1984 Draft and pitched part of three seasons in the Major Leagues. He now puts his experience to use as a roving pitching instructor for the Blue Jays, and Cobi has absorbed a lot of knowledge from his dad. He has much more polish than his father, who was predominantly a basketball player at NCAA Division II St. Thomas (Fla.), had at the same stage of his career.

A Florida State recruit, Johnson is extremely projectable and has a lot of room to add weight on his lanky 6-foot-4 frame. He usually pitches around 88-91 mph and peaks at 93 with his sinking fastball, but he should grow into consistent low-90s velocity. His secondary pitches have similar upside. Both Johnson’s curveball and changeup operate around 78-80 mph and project as solid or better pitches down the road. Thanks to his father’s tutelage, he has a very clean delivery and has no problem filling the strike zone. - Jonathan Mayo MLB.com

Round 36: LHP Kyle McGrath (Louisville)

Round 37: RHP Tyler Wood (Furman U.)

Round 38: 2B Louis-Philippe Pelletier (Cegep De Maisonneuve, QC)

Round 39: 3B Richard Negron (Tallahassee CC)

Round 40: C Bryce Carter (Cascia Hall, Okla., HS)

Carter has decent all-around tools behind the plate and has the chance to be a solid two-way player at the next level. At the plate, Carter already has good power and projects to add more as he matures. He does tend to try and pull everything (which will undoubtedly change if he goes to Stanford) and this gets him into trouble at times.

Behind the plate, he has very good blocking skills due to quick feet and athleticism and has shown a solid arm as well. He also has all the intangibles scouts look for in a catcher, with a great feel for the game and overall leadership skills.

Carter may be a tough sign, however, with a supposed strong commitment to Stanford. - Jonathan Mayo MLB.com

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